Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism

CTNA Receives Competitive Renewal

alt text
 

We are pleased to announce the Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism (CTNA) has received its 2nd competitive renewal from NIAAA. The CTNA will continue its mission for an additional 5 years. Read full press release.

Current CTNA Projects:

Neural mechanisms linking the responses to incentive stimuli to the formation and expression of ethanol-related habits

Taylor Project ImagePrincipal Investigator: Dr. Jane Taylor. This project is a microcosm of the entire CTNA, conducting studies in animals that articulate mechanisms central to each project that could not be explicitly tested in humans. These studies will identify neurobehavioral mechanisms underlying vulnerability to habitual alcohol- seeking behavior and relapse.

Read more...

Alcohol-induced human striatal dopamine release, alcoholism vulnerability, and alcohol dependence

Abi Dargham Project ImagePrincipal Investigators: Dr. Anissa Abi-Dargham  & Dr. Ismene Petrakis. CTNA will test the central hypothesis that the heritable risk for alcoholism reflects dysfunction of cortico-striatal-midbrain circuitry, mediated by the interplay of glutamate and dopamine, that biases people to respond to drug-like rewards relative to delayed reward/punishments. This bias to respond to...

Read more...

Functional neuroimaging of alcoholism vulnerability: glutamate, reward, and Pavlovian-to-Instrumental Transfer

Pearlson Project ImagePrincipal Investigator: Dr. Godfrey Pearlson. This project will clarify the neurobiology of various forms of impulsivity and disordered reward mechanisms seen in individuals at risk for alcoholism. In particular it will use pharmacologic probes of the NMDA system to explore NMDA/DA interactions in the ventral striatum in a series of fMRI tasks related to reward to assess the...

Read more...

Glutamate-opioid interactions in alcohol drinking behaviors

Krisnan-Sarin Project ImagePrincipal Investigator: Dr. Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin. This project extends hypotheses from Projects 1-3 and builds on exciting preliminary findings from prior CTNA projects using our alcohol self-administration paradigm. In CTNA-1, we observed that naltrexone reduced drinking in drinkers with a family history of alcoholism (FHP), but not in family-history negative (FHN)...

Read more...

An Introduction to the CTNA

http://youtu.be/YI8rG5b7xUIAn Introduction to the CTNAFFFFFF480378

The Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism (CTNA), in its third iteration, is funded by a grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.